Fast Facts and Warning Signs

Animal - Toxicity

Toad Toxicity

Toad toxicity occurs when an animal grabs a hold of a cane toad. The cane toad secretes a toxic venom through glands which are located a the back of their head. The cane toad venom is very sticky and irritating.

Signs
  • Excess salivation
  • Vomiting
  • Bright red mucous membranes (gums)
  • In severe cases your animal will also:
  • Muscle spasms
  • Seizures
  • Heart arrhythmias
  • Death
Actions

If you see your animal with a toad, you should immediately wipe the gums with a damp cloth, continually rinsing the cloth in-between wipes. This will need to be done for at least 10-15mins.

If your animal is showing any of the more severe signs or the first signs are not resolving your animal needs veterinary attention immediately.

Poisoning

Signs:
Disorientation, vomiting, seizures, weakness, retching, salivating (excessive).
Action:
CALL a veterinarian immediately. If the source of the poisoning is known have the container with you when you call. You will need information on the packaging to determine the appropriate treatment. If the source is unknown, seek emergency assistance IMMEDIATELY. Treatment should be started as soon as possible to minimize absorption of the poison. If possible, bring the toxic agent with you to the veterinarian.

Artificial Respiration

Check the airway for any foreign objects and then gently hold the muzzle sealing the mouth and lips with your hands. Forcefully blow air into the animal’s nose. Give four or five rapid breaths and then check to see if the animal begins breathing without assistance. If not, repeat until you reach a veterinary hospital or for a maximum of 20 minutes

Performing CPR

DO NOT assume that there is no heartbeat or pulse simply because an animal is not breathing. Do not start chest compressions before checking for a heartbeat. If the animal is conscious and responds to you, then the heart is beating.

Small Dog (< 15 kg.) or Cat:
Lay your pet down on it's right side with the chest facing you. Kneel and place the palm of one of your hands over the ribs at the point where the elbow touches the chest. Place your other hand underneath the right side. With your elbows softly locked, compress the chest 1/2 to 1 inch. If working alone, perform 5 chest compressions for each breath (see above) for five rotations and then check for pulse. If there are two people, have one perform the compressions at a rate of three compressions for each breath, then check for pulse.
Medium to Large Dog (15-40 kg.):
Stand or kneel with the animal’s chest towards you. Extend your arms at the elbows and cup your hands. At the point where the left elbow lies when pulled back to the chest, compress the chest about 1 - 3 inches. If working alone, perform 5 chest compressions for each breath (see above) for five rotations and then check for pulse. If there are two people, have one perform the compressions at a rate of two or three compressions for each breath, then check for pulse.
Giant Dogs (40+ kg.):
Use technique for medium to large dogs but do ten compressions for each breath and then check for pulse.

Vital Signs

Taking a Heart Rate or Pulse:
The heartbeat of a dog or cat can be felt at about the point where the left elbow touches the chest (about the 5th rib). Place your hand or stethoscope over this area and count the heartbeats.

Pulses can also be felt with a light touch on the inner thigh approximately half way between the front and back of the leg, just below the wrist on the front legs or just below the ankle of the rear legs.
Normal Heart and Pulse Rates:
Small breed Dogs (15 kgs.): 100-160 beats per minute.
Medium to large breed Dogs (15+ kgs.): 60-100 beats per minute.
Puppy (until 1 year old): 120-160 beats per minute.
Cats: 60 - 220 beats per minute.
Normal Breathing Rates:
Dogs: 10 - 30 breaths per minute and up to 200 pants per minute.
Cats: 20 - 30 breaths per minute. (Note: Panting in a cat can be a sign of serious illness and requires immediate veterinary attention.)
Normal Temperatures:
Dogs: 37.7° - 39.1° C
Cats: 37.7° - 39.1° C
Proud Supporters of Animal Ambulance - Gold Coast Design Studio
Copyright © 2009 - Animal Ambulance